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Licensed & Insured Aquatic Herbicide Weed Control #CM19510
Serving All of Central Florida
Proud To Be Eco-Friendly
PWC works closely with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and local agencies on all aquatic spray projects

Oct
09
2017

Why do we need to keep stormwater retention ponds clean?

Whether you are an individual property owner, an HOA representative or a commercial property manager, routine maintenance prolongs the life of your stormwater retention pond, improves its appearance, prevents flooding and other property damage and enhances the ecosystems of local streams and lakes. Why do we need to keep stormwater retention ponds clean?

Stormwater runoff is excess rain water that flows into larger water bodies and local storm sewer systems mainly due to the surrounding prevalence of hard surfaces, such as concrete. Large quantities of water that would ordinarily be absorbed into the ground in a more natural environment instead enter streams and lakes. Stormwater runoff collects pollutants, chemicals, and debris as it flows over paved surfaces and into water bodies. It also causes erosion, decreases groundwater recharge and alters aquatic environments.

Your stormwater retention pond (together with others in the area) helps slow the rate of runoff from the surrounding neighborhood and improves the quality of the stormwater flowing from the retention pond. Stormwater retention ponds play a vital role in protecting the safety of public and private property, the personal health and safety of the public, and overall water quality. Your stormwater retention pond's basin collects and traps stormwater sediment that would otherwise clog up our rivers and streams and degrade the overall environment used by fish, birds, and other wildlife.

If you have a rentention pond that needs some TLC, contact the experts at Professional Waterfront Cleanup for a free estimate. 

Aug
21
2017

Here is the best way to remove Spanish moss.

While Spanish moss causes no harm to the tree upon which it resides, many homeowners desire it's removal for aesthetic reasons or for fear that too much of the moss will shield sunlight from reaching the grass or a garden beneath a tree. Spanish moss removal techniques.

In any case, the complete removal of Spanish moss (especially from very large trees) should be handled by a professional to avoid skin irritation, unexpected felling of branches, or other tree-care related dangers. Should you attempt to go it alone, and want to remove it from a small, reachable area, here are a few tips to help get you started:

A word of caution: Always wear gloves when handling any tree work (including the removal of Spanish moss, as it is often infested with tiny bugs that cause skin irritation)
Step 1:
Rake only the lower limbs of the tree containing the Spanish moss. Pull the moss down with either your basic garden rake or by taking a long, sturdy pole with mounted with a hook at the end to grab the moss and pull it down. A 7-foot wooden dowel (2 to 3 inches in diameter) and a 2 to 3-inch hook are available for purchase at most local hardware stores.

Step 2:
WITH GLOVES, use your hands to pull the moss from the rake or hook, and carefully place it into a yard waste bag.

Step 3:
While we do not condone the use of a ladder in DIY tree work if you choose to climb a ladder, be sure the ladder is securely placed on level ground, and that you have a second person to hold the ladder in place as you climb. Please only climb the first two or three steps to reach low hanging moss, and leave anything above that level to tree professionals. Once you are securely on only the bottom parts of your ladder, have your second person (or "spotter") hand you the rake or hook to grab the moss and pull it down.

As always Professional Waterfront Cleanup will be happy to help, contact us for a free quote. 

 

Aug
03
2017

Professional Waterfront Cleanup Featured In Lake & Sumter Style Magazine

lake and Sumter style

If you're out and about throughout Lake or Sumter County during the month of August, make sure you're on the lookout for the magazine rack containing this month's edition of Lake & Sumter Style Magazine featuring an awesome write-up of Professional Waterfront Cleanup. So make sure you pick up a copy, flip to page 71 and have a good read!

Alternatively, you can visit Lake & Sumter Style Magazine to read their online edition. Happy reading!

Jul
03
2017

Why would I paint a porch patio blue?

Whether they're painted the palest of powder blues or various shades of cobalt, aqua, teal, periwinkle or gray - blue porches are popular everywhere, and you may find the reasons behind them (which vary by region) surprising. Blue porch. Why would I paint a porch patio blue?

In the Northwest United States, blue porch ceilings became popular when earlier generations followed the teachings of the Aurora Colony - a Christian communal society that gained popularity in the 1850s.

In the Southern region of the United States (especially in South Carolina) blue porch ceilings originated with the fear of haints - restless spirits of the dead who have not moved on from their physical world. "Haint Blue" is traditionally intended to protect homeowners from being "taken" or influenced by haints.

While most credible sources discredit the belief that blue paint repels insects, a lot of people swear by this technique for enjoying bug-free summer afternoons and evenings. Historically, however, the composition of the first blue paints used was made up of milk paints mixed with lye. Lye (a known insect repellent) explains why insects would avoid nesting on porch ledges or ceilings painted blue in days gone by.

Regardless of whether or not these "traditional" methods work or not, blue is a calming color, so it just makes sense to use it to paint the area of your home that's made specifically for relaxation. Enjoying the outdoors from the comfort of a front porch is a tradition that isn't going anywhere, anytime soon.

Find out more on this beautiful trend. 

May
30
2017

Alligator mating season is one date you don't want to crash.

Spring is here and this month is gator mating season. This annual rite coincides with the dry season that causes a lot of water holes to dry up and for gators to travel further than normal looking for love. Alligator mating season.

"Since the inception of the Everglades, which was 10,000 or 20,000 years ago, the mating season and the breeding season has remained the same every year," according to gator expert and biologist, Joe Wasilewski. But what hasn't remained the same is habitat."

While rare, state Wildlife officers warn that alligator attacks can happen: in 2015, two swimmers — one in Blue Springs State Park south of Orlando and another in Texas— were killed. Another Florida man who fled police was attacked and killed in Brevard County. They were the first such deaths in seven years, and we all know the sad story of the toddler killed on Disney property.

During warm weather and mating season, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spokeswoman Tammy Sapp said people need to keep in mind a few simple rules. Swim only during daylight hours in designated areas. Keep pets on a leash — in November a dog off its leash on a Key Biscayne golf course was attacked and killed. And never, ever feed gators, not even marshmallows.

Gators that overcome their natural fear of humans nearly always have to be trapped and killed. The state also hosts an annual hunt from August through November. Applications for permits and information on gator hunting can found by visiting Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission's website.

And if you have a pool and live in gator habitat, look before leaping!

Read more about alligator mating season.